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Long-Term Ecological Research at the Land-Sea Interface

6: Long-Term Ecological Research at the Land-Sea Interface
Guests:

Kenneth Dunton
University of Texas, Austin
Marine Science Institute

Ken Dunton is project director for the Beaufort Lagoon Ecosystems Long term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.  The researchers within the program are using various methods to track and understand 1) how natural climate cycles influence coastal ecosystems in the Arctic, and 2) how climate change impacts alter coastal ecosystems. Lagoon ecosystems are at the land-sea interface, the zone where the land and ocean meet. Changes within these key environments can impact various aspects of life for the people that depend on them.

Find out more about their research at:

Team Vole

5: Team Vole
Guests:

Jess Steketee
University of New Hampshire

Austin Roy
University of Texas, El Paso

Jess Stekettee and Austin Roy are part of Team Vole, a multi-university collaboration led by Dr. Natalie Boelman from Columbia University. During their time in Utqiagvik, Jess and Austin trapped voles and ran a series of experiments using artifical enclosures on the tundra to learn about small mammal population dynamics and how these tiny herbivores influence carbon cycling.

Find out more about their research at:

Arctic vegetation change

4: Arctic vegetation change
Guests:

Robert Hollister and Mackenzie Lift
Grand Valley State University, Arctic Ecology Program

Bob Hollister has been monitoring vegetation change in the Arctic since the mid-1990s. He is joined in this episode by grad student, Mackenzie Lift. We discussed the long term research project they are part of and what they are learning about the impact of climate change on vegetation and the resulting impacts on other organisms.

Find out more about their research at:

From thawing permafrost to the clouds

3: From thawing permafrost to the clouds
Guests:

Jessie Creamean, Thomas Hill, Marina Nieto-Caballero, Kevin Barry
Colorado State University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Rick Minnich
Independent Filmmaker

Colorado State University, Department of Atmospheric SciencesWe learned about some key impacts of thawing permafrost in Episode 1 with Vladimir Romanovsky and Dmitry Nicolsky. In this episode we talk to Jessie Creamean and her team who are doing research on the cutting edge of another important aspect of permafrost thaw, which is its potential to impact clouds and even local weather.

Waves, erosion, and the journey of sediment

2: Waves, erosion, and the journey of sediment
Guests:

Jim Thomson
University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory

Emily Eidam
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Department of Earth, Marine, and Environmental Sciences

Emily Eidam, Jim Thomson, and their teams are collaborating on two separate but closely related research projects. Thomson's team is trying to understand the impact that larger waves are having on Arctic coastal erosion. Eidam's team, meanwhile, is tracking the journey of the materials that erode from coastal bluffs to understand where they go after they enter the ocean.  

Permafrost monitoring across the North Slope

1: Permafrost monitoring across the North Slope
Guests:

Vladimir Romanovsky
UAF Geophysical Institute

Dmitry Nicolsky
UAF Geophysical Institute

Vladimir Romanovsky and Dmitry Nicolsky are part of a research team studying changes in ground temperature across the North Slope to understand where and how fast permafrost is warming. Thawing permafrost can lead to ground surface caving, changes in terrain, and damage to infrastructure. It can also cause the ground surface to become wetter or drier. These landscape changes are likely to impact many aspects of life for people living on the North Slope and, in this episode, we learn about the science and its practical applications. 

Find out more about their research at:
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